A lift chair, also known as a seat lift chair, is a chair that features a motorized device to help boost you to a standing position or lower you to a seated position. If your doctor or family practitioner has recommended you or a loved one to invest in a lift chair, you may be wondering if the expense is covered by Medicare. In this blog, we’ll discuss the basics of lift chairs and how to determine if your lift chair is covered by Medicare.

If you live near Rockford and you’re shopping for a lift chair, make sure to stop by Lehan’s Medical Supplies & Equipment today. We’ve been serving the medical equipment and medical supply needs of Northern Illinois residents for more than 70 years, and our staff is dedicated to helping you find the best supplies for your needs. Check out our Special Offers online, or contact us today with any questions you may have!

What Is A Lift Chair?

Lift chairs are meant to help people who have trouble getting up from a chair and sitting down into a chair. They can be helpful for people who have suffered a leg injury, as well as seniors who are restricted from performing everyday movements. These comfortable and innovative solutions come in a variety of specialized models. From two-position lift chairs to infinite lift chairs, you may be confused when it comes time to start shopping for your own. Luckily, the professionals at Lehan’s are here to help you decipher the differences between each model.

Two-Position Lift Chairs

This model of lift chair will typically recline 40-45 degrees. If there is an ottoman attached to this chair, it will normally rise as the chair reclines to a comfortable position.

Three-Position Lift Chairs

This type of lift chair will recline to an almost flat position. This is a great option for people who like to take naps in their chair, as they can lay flat on their back for optimum comfort.

Infinite-Position Lift Chairs

This lift chair can recline all the way backwards to a flat position, and these models normally have separate controls for the recline and ottoman settings. If you’re not sure which kind of lift chair is best for you, contact the medical supply experts at Lehan’s today.

Medicare Coverage & Your Lift Chair

If your physical therapist or physician has recommended a lift chair, a portion of the expenses may be covered in Medicare Part B. Since there are two main components of a lift chair, the seat-lift mechanism and the actual chair itself, your Medicare coverage may only cover the device that is actually used to lift the patient up. This is because this unique device is the only component that meets the durable medical equipment (DME) coverage. In some instances, Medicare may cover the lift mechanism portion of the lift chair if your doctor has determined that it is medically necessary to help your condition. You may also be eligible for Medicare coverage if:

  • You suffer from severe arthritis in your hip and knees.
  • You have muscular dystrophy or another kind of neuromuscular disease.
  • You are unable to stand up from a chair or bed without the help of another person or medical equipment.

If you need a seat-lift mechanism for your lift chair, you’ll need to get this specialized equipment through a supplier that is enrolled in the Medicare program. These providers are able to help you save money on your lift chair, and when you purchase these parts from a Medicare provider, you won’t have to worry about paying the full cost of the equipment. In most cases, you’ll be asked to pay 20 percent of the Medicare-approved amount once the Medicare Part B deductible is applied.

It’s important to keep in mind that if you have an Original Medicare (Part A and Part B) and you live in an area that has been affected by the Medicare Competitive Bidding Program, you’ll need to get your lift chair from contract suppliers or Medicare won’t cover the cost.

If you need assistance choosing the best lift chair for your condition, visit Lehan’s Medical Supplies & Equipment in Rockford today! In addition to our lift chairs, we offer sleep apnea devices and supplies, compression socks, stairlifts, and mobility scooters.